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Domestic interest in Nigerian market decreases

Domestic transactions in the Nigerian Stock Exchange (NSE) has declined by 66.68 per cent compared with 12 years ago, a year before the great crash of the market.

In 2008, investors lost about N6.96tn within a space of nine months. The market capitalisation of equities listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange, which opened the year 2008 at N12.6tn, hit an all-time high of N13.5tn in March but fell to a record low of N6.54tn at the end of the year.

In its latest Domestic and Foreign Portfolio Investment (FPI) report released on Wednesday, the exchange said that domestic transactions dropped to N1.18 trillion in 2018 from N3.55 trillion in 2007.

The exchange said that foreign transactions during the same period rose by 97.88 per cent to N1.22 trillion compared with N616 million in 2007.

In the same vein, total foreign transactions stood at 51 per cent, while domestic transactions accounted for 49 per cent in 2018.

The NSE added that total transactions increased to N121.99 billion (about 398.0 million dollars) in August 2019.

It said that the figure represented a growth of 7.51 per cent when compared with N113.47 billion or 370.4 million dollars posted in July 2019.

Furthermore, the total value of transactions executed by foreign investors in August 2019 outperformed that of domestic investors by four per cent.

Specifically, foreign participation stood at 52 per cent compared with domestic participation of 48 per cent in August.

Foreign inflow stood at N34.92 billion against the domestic inflow of N26.45 billion in the same period.

Further analysis shows that foreign outflow in August stood at N29.98 billion in contrast with a domestic outflow of N31.64 billion in the same review period.

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